How to Become an Urban Farmer in Dallas

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Monica Rose / Photo by Elizabeth Lavin.

In 2014, she launched Edible Landscapes Dallas after repeated requests to cultivate personal, “menu-specific” gardens.

By Jill Broussard And Elizabeth Lavin
D Home
May 20, 2018

Excerpt:

Monica Rose tends to her thoughtfully planted culinary gardens as a painter would contemplate every stroke—she nourishes, pinches, gathers produce, replants. At 28, she is quietly pioneering a farm-to-table movement from the backyards of many Dallas homeowners. In 2014, she launched Edible Landscapes Dallas after repeated requests to cultivate personal, “menu-specific” gardens. She now has the incredible challenge of designing, installing, and maintaining nearly 100 bespoke gardens for homeowners in Highland Park, Addison, Plano, Arlington, and Dallas and also offers landscape, floral, and interior plant design services.

Local beekeeper Miriana Andreeva researched through blogs, Facebook pages, and local educational classes before getting bees. She keeps stevia, salvia, peonies, roses, herbs, and holly in her backyard for them to feed on. “There’s a plethora of options for them to forage freely,” she says. If you plan to follow suit, open the hive every eight weeks to check on the bees, but monitor weather conditions, humidity, blooming plants, and “traffic patterns” daily. But the biggest part of beekeeping is education. Join a group and take classes at the Trinity Valley Beekeepers Association or the Texas Honeybee Guild. “BeeGirl” Christi Baughman teaches classes in Seagoville, as does Round Rock Honey in Rowlett.

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